SAVE THE ELLIOT STATE FOREST


Overview of the issue

Article and photo from the




Above write-up and photos from 350.Eugene Website



GRANNIES OVER THE LAST TWO YEARS HAVE TRAVELED FROM COOS BAY TO KEIZER IN   OPPOSING THIS PROJECT


JUNE 28, 2017

JUNE 14, 2016  

APRIL 12, 2016

JANUARY 7, 2016

NOVEMBER 19, 2015

SEPTEMBER 26, 2015

SEPTEMBER 15, 2015

MAY 26, 2015


The Elliott State Forest near Coos Bay, Ore., is considered one of the best public recreation areas on the state coastline. However, the Elliott State Forest Sale nearly took this all away. This public lands gem consists of more than 82,000 acres that provide unmatched experiences for local hunters, anglers, and wildlife enthusiasts. It also borders Loon Lake and is very close to the Bureau of Land Management’s Dean Creek Elk Management Area and Golden and Silver Falls State Natural Area.

However, the Elliott has become the poster child for what could happen if America’s public lands wind up in the hands of individual states. Put simply, states are in the business of selling their trust lands, like the Elliott, to generate revenue. In Oregon, where sustainable timber harvest on state trust lands is intended to support public education funding, recent restrictions and lawsuits have limited logging, and ownership of the forest has become a financial drain on the state—rather than a source of income. After more than a year of negotiations, it looked certain that the forest would be sold to private interests, but recent developments have sportsmen and women hopeful.

Dozens of Oregonians from all over the state gathered June 27, 28 and 29th at hearings in Coos Bay, Roseberg, and Klamath Falls, respectively, to vociferously denounce the FERC’s reconsideration of permitting the Pacific Connector-LNG projects in Southern Oregon after twice denying these projects.


These scoping hearings are when the public and state agencies get to look through the impact studies the company has submitted and suggest other necessary impacts we want FERC to consider.

The Canadian oil & gas Company, Veresen (recently bought out by Pembina) has reapplied to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to build the Pacific Connector Pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG terminal in Coos Bay, in hopes that Trump’s new FERC appointees will rubber stamp the project.



Type your paragraph here.

Landowners,

Labor,

Grannies,

Youth, and Zombies

Say NO (again) to FERC

Concerning Pacific Connector-LNG


June 27, 28 and 29, 2017

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS:  Environmentalist, sportsmen and women took action and asked the Oregon State Land Board not to sell the 84,000-acre Elliott State Forest so that hunting, fishing, and other priceless outdoor recreation opportunities can continue. The Land Board came through for Oregon families and countless visitors by voting unanimously to keep the Elliott in public hands.

Now it is up to the Oregon Legislature to follow through. State legislators need to hear from you NOW so they will take a stand for a public solution for the Elliott—one that will protect access and recreation, critical habitat, and cultural values, while producing a sustainable supply of timber to fulfill the fiduciary obligation to the Common School Fund.

Twice already, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has said that a fracked gas pipeline and export project in Southern Oregon, proposed by a Canadian corporation, is not in the public interest. Once in March 2016, and again in December 2016. 

But Veresen, the company proposing the Pacific Connector Pipeline and the Jordan Cove LNG Export Terminal, is hoping that the influence of huge campaign contributions from the fossil fuel industry in the 2016 elections will push Congress, the White House, and Oregon state agencies to allow this zombie pipeline project to come back from the dead.

In December 2017, Veresen announced that they planned to try again and in January 2017, started the pre-filing process to ask FERC to consider the Jordan Cove Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) export project again.  

This 233 mile pipeline and fracked gas export project would trample the rights of landowners through use of eminent domain, disturb tribal territories and burial grounds, threaten 400 waterways, put existing jobs in fishing, tourism, and other sectors at risk, drive up energy prices, and create a major new source of climate pollution.

The campaign to stop the proposed LNG Pipeline through southern Oregon is comprised of landowners, businesses, climate and conservation groups, native tribes, and concerned residents working together to protect our home from fossil fuel exports and create clean energy jobs instead.  

  Raging Grannies Eugene


JORDAN COVE ENERGY PROJECT

GRANNIES RAGE IN SALEM IN

THE FIGHT TO SAVE THE

ELLIOT FOREST


MAY 9, 2017

DECEMBER 13, 2016

OCTOBER 11, 2016

JUNE 14, 2016

MAY 9, 2016


Photos by Eugene Granny Katharine Hunt